Renewable Energy and Jobs – What Prospects Does the Market Offer?

The smarter E Podcast Episode 47 | April 22, 2021

Renewable energies are cost-effective, flexible and resilient energy sources and they employ more and more people worldwide. This is the conclusion of the latest study by IRENA (International Renewable Energy Agency), which estimates that there will be approximately 11.5 million jobs in the renewable sector in 2019.

Around the world politicians are calling for a Green Deal - creating jobs while decarbonising our economies. And indeed it does sound like a stellar plan: battling climate change while creating jobs. But is the rise of renewables really connected to a substantial increase in jobs?

Michael Renner, Programs Officer at IRENA, tells us.

Timeline:

  • 2.45: What are the current figures?
  • 5.32: About countries with the biggest potential
  • 9.42: Which qualifications are currently in particular demand?
  • 13.48: What is the specific situation in the sector of energy storage and emobility?

About The smarter E Podcast

The smarter E podcast is all about the current trends and developments in a renewable, decentralized and digital energy industry. Our moderators Tobias Bücklein and Zackes Brustik welcome and interview personalities who shape our industry and drive developments forward. A new episode is published every Thursday.

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About Michael Renner and IRENA

The International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) is an international governmental organization dedicated to promoting the development and sustainable use of renewable energy worldwide. Founded in Bonn in 2009, it currently has 149 members, with another 27 countries in the process of joining. IRENA represents the global voice for renewable energy in international debates.

Michael Renner is a Programme Officer in IRENA’s Knowledge Policy and Finance Centre in Abu Dhabi, with a focus on the socio-economic benefits of renewable energy. Prior to joining IRENA in 2017, he was a Senior Researcher at the Worldwatch Institute, a US-based research organisation. His principal focus since the early 1990s has been on the linkages between environment, energy and employment.